Are you concerned about protecting your assets if you need Medicaid for nursing home care  in New York?

Do you have questions about the Medicaid assets limits and the Medicaid look-back?

“14 Ways to Preserve Your Assets with the New York  Medicaid Laws” seminar will be presented for free  at the Clarence Senior Center, 4600 Thompson Rd, Clarence, NY 14031 on Thursday, April 6, 2017 at 1:30 PM .

Have your Medicaid questions answered by Robert Friedman, Attorney and Jeff Vastola, CLU of M&T Securities who will discuss: Continue Reading Medicaid Planning Seminar

The soaring cost and prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease has a tremendous impact on our nation’s families and economy. This is according to a disturbing 2017 report released yesterday by the Alzheimer’s Association.

The statistics in the report emphasize the need for estate and Medicaid planning for disability.  390,000 New York residents 65 and older suffered from Alzheimer’s disease last year.

Total annual payments for health care, long-term care and hospice care for people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias exceed  a quarter of a trillion dollars. $175 billion of Continue Reading Devastating Costs of Alzheimer’s Dementia Care

You are being discharged from a New York hospital after surgery.  How do you designate your daughter to be your caregiver when you return home to recuperate? What if your daughter needs instructions on how to care for you?

The Caregiver Advise, Record, and Enable (CARE) Act amended the New York Public Health Law to require that hospitals allow patients to formally designate a caregiver (such as a relative, partner, friend or neighbor) before they leave the hospital or are transferred to another facility . Hospitals are to provide the caregiver with instruction or training on how to perform tasks for the patient at home, such as changing bandages or administering medication . However, patients are not required to designate caregivers and caregivers are not obligated to perform after-care tasks for patients .

The patient must consent to disclose his or her health information to the caregiver . If the patient  designates a CARE Act caregiver, the hospital must:

(a)include the name and contact information of the caregiver in the patient’s discharge plan;

(b)attempt to notify the caregiver of the patient’s transfer to another health care facility;

(c)attempt to contact the caregiver prior to a patient’s discharge to his or her residence so that the caregiver can provide after-care assistance in accordance with the hospital’s instructions to the caregiver;

(d) as soon as possible prior (and if possible, 24 hours prior) to the patient’s discharge  consult with the identified caregiver along with the patient regarding the patient’s after-care needs at his or her residence; and

(e) offer caregivers written or verbal  instruction in all after-care tasks, taking into account the capabilities and limitations of the caregiver for patients being discharged to their home.

To be certain that your family members have access to your medical information should you become incapacitated, execute a health care proxy and living will.

Are you concerned about losing your assets if you need Medicaid for nursing home care  in New York?

“14 Ways to Preserve Your Assets with the New York  Medicaid Laws” seminar will be presented for free  at the:

Have your Medicaid questions answered by Robert Friedman, Attorney and Jeff Vastola, CLU of M&T Securities who will discuss: Continue Reading 14 Ways to Preserve Your Assets

 

Many people are procrastinators and afraid to face their own mortality. They often fail to properly plan for death, disability and retirement. Clients often tell me that if they knew estate planning was so easy, that they would have done it years ago.

Estate planning is often neither complicated nor costly. However, failure to plan is very costly, complicated and stressful.

Over the past thirty-eight years of practicing Elder and Estate Law, I have observed my clients make these common estate planning and Medicaid planning mistakes: Continue Reading 20 Most Common Estate Planning Mistakes